When these kids grow up, the Wyoming Legislature will have likely spent the state's Rainy Day Fund because they didn't want to raise taxes.
Sometimes good things happen when adults screw up!

Wyo Senate scuttles education funding bill, sparing school cuts

In a last-day legislative surprise, lawmakers from the Wyoming House and Senate failed to agree on the details of a bill that would have dramatically cut public education funding. As a result of legislators’ failure to govern, K-12 schools will be spared budget cuts for now. But the structural problem of our education funding model remains.
Bigger classes and less one-on-one attention are among the drawbacks of decreased school funding.

Wyo Legislature looks to end fifth straight session with deep education cuts

The House and Senate have come up with two different versions of an education funding bill: One that cuts public school budgets, and another that cuts them even more. Lawmakers will end the session tomorrow debating which version will prevail.
Some lawmakers think it makes no sense to cut school funding while sitting on billions in savings.

House Education Committee dials back Wyoming education cuts

Wyoming is not broke. And funding schools is a constitutional requirement. As lawmakers deliberate a bill to dramatically cut education funding, second thoughts begin to emerge.
Voucher programs across the nation have decreased student achievement, but they have succeeded in helping to defund public education.

Proposed school voucher program would further defund Wyoming public education

A bill to funnel public money to private, religious, and home schools will appear before a Wyoming legislative committee this week, providing lawmakers the option to offer students “thoughts and prayers” rather than sustainable school funding.
“To drastically cut our school budgets will cripple our children's ability to build the skills they need for our state to compete in the future economy. We will become a backwater, poor state that offers no hope for its people.”

Screw the schools, screw the youth: Wyoming lawmakers refuse tax proposals to fund education (and everything else)

Wyoming’s population is shrinking and aging, and the Good Ol’ Boys in the Legislature staunchly oppose new taxes. But younger generations who would like to build their lives here are starting to speak up against budget cuts that would cripple the state’s education system and economy.
Wyoming's dependence on plummeting fossil fuel revenues has the state's whole education funding structure crumbling.

Wyoming lawmakers try to “recalibrate” school funding while the whole system collapses around us

The ho-hum, business-as-usual “recalibration” process to determine proper state education funding levels looks absurd in the face of a $500 million budget catastrophe.
Inflation-based cost adjustments, special education, and school districts' discretionary funds were all decreased.

Wyoming schools spared deep funding cuts despite the Senate’s best efforts

A veto by Governor Mark Gordon helped House education advocates fend off severe funding cuts pushed by the Senate throughout the Wyoming Legislature’s 2020 session. But they couldn’t stop them all.
For the fourth straight year, the Senate will try to defund Wyoming education while the House will attempt to shield schools from harmful cuts.

Four ways to cut school funding: House and Senate at odds as education budget negotiations begin

The Senate is proposing nearly $40 million less than the House for the state education budget, looking to cut funding for cost-of-living raises, transportation, discretionary funds, and compensation for National Board Certified teachers.
The bill would decrease discretionary funds school districts use to attract and retain quality teachers.

Senate committee advances bill to cut $16.5 million from Wyoming school funding

A bill to cut transportation and discretionary funds would largely offset the “External cost adjustment” districts are set to receive to buoy teacher salaries.
When these kids grow up, the Wyoming Legislature will have likely spent the state's Rainy Day Fund because they didn't want to raise taxes.

Wyoming House kills bill to create new school funding source, will instead spend state savings

The House declined to hold an introductory vote on a proposed corporate income tax that would have generated tens of millions of dollars each year for Wyoming schools.