Foster and his zany school bill crew. From rear: Sen. Mike Gierau, former U.S. Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis, Sen. Eli Bebout, Stephen Friess, Foster Friess
Wyoming's dependence on plummeting fossil fuel revenues has the state's whole education funding structure crumbling.

Wyoming lawmakers try to “recalibrate” school funding while the whole system collapses around us

The ho-hum, business-as-usual “recalibration” process to determine proper state education funding levels looks absurd in the face of a $500 million budget catastrophe.
Inflation-based cost adjustments, special education, and school districts' discretionary funds were all decreased.

Wyoming schools spared deep funding cuts despite the Senate’s best efforts

A veto by Governor Mark Gordon helped House education advocates fend off severe funding cuts pushed by the Senate throughout the Wyoming Legislature’s 2020 session. But they couldn’t stop them all.
For the fourth straight year, the Senate will try to defund Wyoming education while the House will attempt to shield schools from harmful cuts.

Four ways to cut school funding: House and Senate at odds as education budget negotiations begin

The Senate is proposing nearly $40 million less than the House for the state education budget, looking to cut funding for cost-of-living raises, transportation, discretionary funds, and compensation for National Board Certified teachers.
The bill would decrease discretionary funds school districts use to attract and retain quality teachers.

Senate committee advances bill to cut $16.5 million from Wyoming school funding

A bill to cut transportation and discretionary funds would largely offset the “External cost adjustment” districts are set to receive to buoy teacher salaries.
When these kids grow up, the Wyoming Legislature will have likely spent the state's Rainy Day Fund because they didn't want to raise taxes.

Wyoming House kills bill to create new school funding source, will instead spend state savings

The House declined to hold an introductory vote on a proposed corporate income tax that would have generated tens of millions of dollars each year for Wyoming schools.
Who thinks your teacher's pay should increase at the rate of inflation? Anyone?

Wyoming legislators want to cut education funding. So why are they giving teachers raises?

The Wyoming Legislature is looking to increase education funding by $38 million so school districts can give teachers cost-of-living raises. Lawmakers aren’t doing it because they want to—they’re doing it because our state constitution demands it.
Tax experts dismissed the argument that the tax would violate either the U.S. Constitution's Commerce Clause or the Wyoming State Constitution's Uniformity Clause.

Opponents of a proposed Wyoming corporate income tax say it’s unconstitutional. They’re wrong.

Naysayers who don’t want to admit they support Walmart over Wyoming schools are using a bogus technical argument.
Wyoming lawmakers capped special education spending in 2018, leaving school districts wondering how to cover the costs of services children need.

As state money for special education dries up, Wyoming looks to Medicaid

Dwindling mineral revenues threaten Wyoming’s ability to provide costly special education services. Legislators can pursue federal Medicaid funds to help, like most states do. But they’re learning there’s no such thing as easy money.
Lawmakers struggle to understand that zero new revenues is the wrong answer.

Lawmakers fail to figure out new revenues for Wyoming public school funding, but avoid further cuts—2019 Legislative recap

After three consecutive years of deep cuts to the Wyoming public education budget, the Legislature relented this session. But without stable sources of revenue, more school cuts are likely on the way.
Foster and his zany school bill crew. From rear: Sen. Mike Gierau, former U.S. Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis, Sen. Eli Bebout, Stephen Friess, Foster Friess

Foster Friess’ Magic School Bill rides into the law books — 2019 Legislative recap

Gov. Mark Gordon allowed the bill to become law today without signing it. The debate over what Gordon called “flawed” legislation pitted “school choice” advocates against defenders of local control.