Sen. Perkins might give handouts to coal companies, but not tax relief to poor folks or cost-of-living bumps for state retiree checks.
Some lawmakers think it makes no sense to cut school funding while sitting on billions in savings.

House Education Committee dials back Wyoming education cuts

Wyoming is not broke. And funding schools is a constitutional requirement. As lawmakers deliberate a bill to dramatically cut education funding, second thoughts begin to emerge.
Voucher programs across the nation have decreased student achievement, but they have succeeded in helping to defund public education.

Proposed school voucher program would further defund Wyoming public education

A bill to funnel public money to private, religious, and home schools will appear before a Wyoming legislative committee this week, providing lawmakers the option to offer students “thoughts and prayers” rather than sustainable school funding.
Supporters of the bill presented no evidence of voter fraud in Wyoming, yet claimed it might happen in the future.

Wyoming lawmakers use “voter fraud” hysteria to push ID bill

A bill to require Wyoming voters to present IDs at the polls will pass this session after several years of failure. As the Wyoming State GOP outlines plans to ban mail-in voting and other restrictions, the measure appears the first step in a larger campaign to limit elections in the state.
A bill to cut $250M from education would be disastrous.

Wyoming school districts clap back at proposed education budget cuts

School districts across Wyoming told lawmakers that proposed budget cuts would eliminate hundreds of jobs and prevent them from delivering quality, equitable education as required by law. The Legislature is going forward with the cuts anyway.
Take your place among the hallowed halls of the Legislature's Zoom meeting.

A user’s guide to the bizarre, online 2021 Wyoming legislative session

This year's online legislative session provides unprecedented access for Wyoming residents to watch and participate. Find out what’s going on next week and how you can take part (virtually!) in the legislative process.
"Let's see ... Where does this gadget stick in here?"

Wyoming Legislature plugs in for an unprecedented "virtual" special session

The Wyoming Legislature is bad at transparency, lacks modern technological infrastructure, and is about to convene an emergency "virtual" session the public can't attend to appropriate more than $1 billion in federal COVID-19 funding. What could possibly go wrong?
Wyoming towns and counties rely on state funds to help pay for local services. But state funds are drying up.

Legislature passes a bill making it easier for Wyoming communities to tax themselves

The increased ability for towns and counties to raise revenues is a nod toward diversifying Wyoming's tax structure. But because the new revenues will come from sales tax, they will come at the highest cost to the state's poorest residents.
Inflation-based cost adjustments, special education, and school districts' discretionary funds were all decreased.

Wyoming schools spared deep funding cuts despite the Senate’s best efforts

A veto by Governor Mark Gordon helped House education advocates fend off severe funding cuts pushed by the Senate throughout the Wyoming Legislature’s 2020 session. But they couldn’t stop them all.
The "born alive" bill would create a law rarely, if ever, used. But it's an incremental tool in the larger anti-abortion effort.

Wyoming House advances last surviving abortion bill of the budget session

The bill would criminalize doctors who fail to perform life-saving measures for infants meant to be aborted but that are accidentally “born alive”—a law that would rarely, if ever, be applied in Wyoming, since abortions after 12 weeks are illegal here and fetuses are not viable until at least 20 - 23 weeks. Two other anti-abortion bills have been defeated.
Sen. Perkins might give handouts to coal companies, but not tax relief to poor folks or cost-of-living bumps for state retiree checks.

Wyoming Senate President singlehandedly kills two antipoverty bills

A tax rebate program for elderly and disabled poor people and a cost-of-living increase for retired state workers both passed the House. But the bills died in the desk of Senate President Drew Perkins, who refused to introduce them for consideration.