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Without a veto from Gov. Gordon, UW students won't be able to rely on their own private insurance plans to cover abortion.

Legislature strongarms University of Wyoming over student health insurance abortion coverage

Lawmakers used budget amendments last week to force UW to re-negotiate its student group insurance plan to remove abortion coverage. This is despite the fact that student insurance consists of private plans paid for with private funds.
Republicans control 77 of the Wyoming Legislature's 90 seats, all five statewide elected offices, and the state's entire U.S. Congressional delegation. But that's not enough...

After last year’s defeats, bills return to reinforce Wyoming GOP power

Bills to ban “crossover voting” in party primaries and to decrease minority party participation in the Legislature’s Management Council died in 2019. New, less strident versions are back in 2020.
Rene Hinkle, a Cheyenne OBGYN, listens to a question from the Judiciary Committee while Reps. Art Washut, Chuck Gray, and Tim Salazar look on.

A bad rerun: 48-hour waiting period for abortions clears Wyoming House committee

The same bill, which would imprison doctors who violate the waiting period for up to ten years, passed the same committee last year with the same vote.
People from around the world travel to Wyoming and stay at hotels like the Old Faithful Inn.

Wyoming House advances statewide lodging tax bill

The proposal would impose a 5 percent tax on hotel stays, generating an estimated $19 million per year mostly from out-of-state visitors.
Three anti-abortion amigos in the Wyoming Legislature, from left: Sen. Bo Biteman, Rep. Richard Tass, and Sen. Cheri Steinmetz sponsored anti-choice bills in 2020.

Wyoming Legislature introduces three anti-abortion measures, including extreme “Heartbeat bill”

The “heartbeat bill” would effectively ban abortion in Wyoming. Another would mandate a waiting period for the procedure. The third is a pointless barb in the culture wars.
When these kids grow up, the Wyoming Legislature will have likely spent the state's Rainy Day Fund because they didn't want to raise taxes.

Wyoming House kills bill to create new school funding source, will instead spend state savings

The House declined to hold an introductory vote on a proposed corporate income tax that would have generated tens of millions of dollars each year for Wyoming schools.
Who thinks your teacher's pay should increase at the rate of inflation? Anyone?

Wyoming legislators want to cut education funding. So why are they giving teachers raises?

The Wyoming Legislature is looking to increase education funding by $38 million so school districts can give teachers cost-of-living raises. Lawmakers aren’t doing it because they want to—they’re doing it because our state constitution demands it.
Controversial bills tend to at least get debated in the Wyoming Legislature, but this year lawmakers killed Medicaid expansion without uttering a phrase.

Wyoming House wastes no time—or words—killing Medicaid expansion

A bill to expand Medicaid failed an introductory vote Monday, just hours after the Legislature convened, leaving tens of thousands of Wyomingites without healthcare … again.
Peter Wold thinks Wyoming should tax huge corporations like Walmart to diversify the state's revenue structure

Wyoming oil CEO supports state corporate income tax

Peter Wold, president of Wold Oil Properties, has a message for the Wyoming legislature: Diversify our state tax structure by passing the National Corporate Profit Recapture Act.
Corporations suck profits out of Wyoming and offer little but low-paying jobs. A proposed tax on "big box" businesses like Walmart would help keep some of that money in our communities.

FIVE FACTS: The National Corporate Profit Recapture Act

There’s a lot of hype, misinformation, and outright lies surrounding a proposed corporate income tax in Wyoming. Here are five facts you need to understand.