Entries by BetterWyoming

Wyoming Legislature plugs in for an unprecedented “virtual” special session

The Wyoming Legislature is bad at transparency, lacks modern technological infrastructure, and is about to convene an emergency “virtual” session the public can’t attend to appropriate more than $1 billion in federal COVID-19 funding. What could possibly go wrong?

Proposal to help stop COVID-related evictions passes Wyoming legislative committee

The bill would create a program that uses federal emergency funds to reimburse landlords who have experienced rental losses as a result of COVID-19, protecting both landlord and renter. The Legislature will consider the proposal during a special session next week.

Already behind, Wyoming women hit hard by COVID crisis

Low-wage workers living paycheck-to-paycheck are least prepared to grapple with layoffs and cut hours resulting from the COVID crisis. By far, most low-wage workers in Wyoming are women.

Governor Gordon can and should stop COVID-related evictions in Wyoming

As unemployment spikes during the pandemic, Wyoming workers are increasingly unable to make housing payments. Federal measures and the goodwill of banks and landlords do not offer Wyoming families the housing protections they need.

Legislature passes a bill making it easier for Wyoming communities to tax themselves

The increased ability for towns and counties to raise revenues is a nod toward diversifying Wyoming’s tax structure. But because the new revenues will come from sales tax, they will come at the highest cost to the state’s poorest residents.

Wyoming schools spared deep funding cuts despite the Senate’s best efforts

A veto by Governor Mark Gordon helped House education advocates fend off severe funding cuts pushed by the Senate throughout the Wyoming Legislature’s 2020 session. But they couldn’t stop them all.

Wyoming House advances last surviving abortion bill of the budget session

The bill would criminalize doctors who fail to perform life-saving measures for infants meant to be aborted but that are accidentally “born alive”—a law that would rarely, if ever, be applied in Wyoming, since abortions after 12 weeks are illegal here and fetuses are not viable until at least 20 – 23 weeks. Two other anti-abortion bills have been defeated.